Trucks! Equipment! Action!

Popcorn in hand, you take your seat as the lights lower and the projector begins to hum, lighting up the screen in front of you. At the movie theater you’re settled in for a couple solid hours of entertainment. But before you bought your ticket, hundreds of workers were putting in months of hard work to create the movie-set. We don’t often think of Hollywood as involving the construction and transportation industries, but building and driving are big parts of the work it takes to bring movies to life!! Check out some amazing industry stories below (and after, we’d love for you to tell us who would play you in a movie)!!

Lighting technician working on a shoot

  • Intolerance (1916): The multi-million dollar replica of the Wall of Babylon spanned four square city blocks, reached 1,000 feet high and 5,300 feet wide, and featured an army of 3,000 extras, elephant handlers, pyrotechnicians, and crew members. The production was so big, that most workers assumed they were making four separate films.
  • The Ten Commandments (1923): Once completed, the director, Cecile B. DeMille, allowed the entire massive set — built by 1,600 workers — be swallowed back up by the California desert where it was filmed. It was only in 2012 that the Sphinx was spotted and the set rediscovered. DeMille later remade this silent film into the famous 1956 version with Charlton Heston.
  • It’s a Wonderful Life (1946): This set featured four acres with a main street that stretched three city blocks, complete with 75 stores and buildings, a residential neighborhood, a working bank, and 20 full grown oak trees. Pigeons, cats, and dogs were allowed to roam the massive set in order to give it a “lived-in feel.”
  • Ben-Hur (1957): 1,000 workers carved away at a rock quarry for more than a year to create the famous arena. More than 40,000 tons of white sand was imported from Mexico for the track before it was swarmed by 8,000 extras.
  • The Goonies (1985): One-Eyed Willie’s massive 105 foot long ship was concealed from the young cast so filmmakers could capture the child actors’ initial wonderment during the first take. However, this backfired when the youngsters let out a series of curse words that would have bumped the PG-rated movie several notches up the ratings scale.
  • Titanic (1997): The film featured a replica of the Titanic, built 90% to scale. Measuring 800 feet long and 90 feet wide, the ship was too large to fit in any studio and was built on the Mexican coastline with 90,000 gallons of water being dumped into the Grand Staircase.
  • Avengers: Infinity War (2018): The upcoming film has so many stars, their back-lot has 50 trailers to house the cast-members!! A sophisticated trailer can range in price from $100k to $400k. End-to-end, the vehicles required for a major production could stretch for miles. In fact, fleets that serve movie sets have workshops set up right on-site for lube and oil changes and small repairs.

That’s all pretty amazing!! And it got us thinking, if we made a movie about our customers, which actors and actresses would be cast in the leading roles?? So we thought we’d ask you!! Click HERE and let us know who would play YOU in a movie about your life!!

 

Sources: http://www.ranker.com/list/biggest-movie-sets/derrick-deane
http://www.denofgeek.com/us/movies/movie-sets/252787/12-of-the-biggest-and-most-expensive-movie-sets
http://comicbook.com/2017/06/05/avengers-3-infinity-war-set-photos-cast-trailers/
http://variety.com/2017/artisans/production/quixote-trailers-1201998375/
http://www.truckinginfo.com/channel/fleet-management/article/story/2017/02/truck-fleet-targets-niche-filming-market.aspx

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